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Board Games: Just How Are They Made? From Inception to Your Table.

Board Games: How Are They Made? From Inception to Your Table.

How often have you played board games and wondered about the manufacturing process of putting them together? I mean, it can’t be that hard, right? A board, a few cards and perhaps some characters. A visit you your local printer and bob’s your uncle! Well, we’ve all done it and, as much as my mind’s eye thought it could imagine the process for getting even the simplest of board games up and running, it appears that I didn’t know the half of it.

Anyone with a bit of artistic imagination who is prepared to follow do it yourself guides can by-pass the heavyweight manufacturing process and produce something quite playable. Clearly, this is fine if you just want to see your game up and running in a basic form. Your friends will be impressed! More on that in another article. Needless to say, it’s not the most slick and glossy way to present your creation but it doesn’t incur the considerable cost associated with finding it sitting on the shelves of the biggest game store in town.

So, I went in search of some information on manufacturing and the production process. Rather than sit and read endless board games articles which can often be dry and tedious, I headed over to YouTube to see what I could find. As you might expect, there were all kinds of “board games” videos from theory to playing, but they didn’t fit the bill. I eventually found something that I thought would be both interesting to watch and of value to perspective board games inventors.

It’s an overview.

It’s a tad lengthy (43:01) so I popped in some time counts in case you wanted a speedier look. Nonetheless, it’s worth grabbing a coffee and sitting down to watch.

They say that a new game takes at least 2-4 months from the formative process to the store shelves. From my own life experience I would say double it; these things always seem to take much longer than you think.

I should mention that neither myself of the owners of this website have any association with the company promoting itself here.  Anyway..the video is called Made for Play: Board Games & Modern Industry.

Below I have posted a few of the games I spied along the way. Naturally, you can find them on this website so I have linked them to the product, as the old cliche goes – for your convenience!

The Run Down

1:08: The Recipe. Component and Cost Breakdown. Game board, Tokens, Wood, Plastic, Cards, The Box, Rulebooks, Print run, Shipping, Partners
5:12    A Trip to the Printer, Cutting Cards
16:26 Main Factory
17:30 Game Boards
22:43 Custom Tools
25:40 Box Making Machines
29:46 Assembly
32:33 Packing
34:28 Storage
37:43 Trade Shows and Global Markets

A Few Games We Spied in the Video

Manhattan Project FROM THE ASHES OF WAR, NATIONS RISE TO POWER IN THE ATOMIC AGE. Each player takes control of a nation struggling for power in the latter part of the 20th century.

Elfenland Pick up cards and tokens reflecting six fantastical travel options– giant pig, dragon, troll wagon, unicorn, magic cloud and elfcycle..

Mexica – Mexica is an investment game, requiring players to successful block their opponents while vying for majority with simple and subtle rules.

Tikal Set in the Central American jungles, the aim of this intriguing board game is to search the lost temples for treasures.

Hare & Tortoise The most ingenious race game ever devised is no idle boast

Discworld – Welcome to Ankh-Morpork, the oldest, greatest, and most odorous city on Terry Pratchett’s Discworld, a place where trouble is always in the cards.

Race for the Galaxy Build the most prosperous and powerful space empire

7 Wonders  There are three ways to win: military dominance, scientific dominance, or amassing the most victory points by game-end.

Carcassone A simple but clever tile laying game that brings new challenges with every turn. Players may deploy their followers as thieves, farmers, knights and monks and score points.

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